If you're an artist and have a knack for graphic design, you could do online design work for websites and businesses. This could be everything from making small graphics for advertisements to full site redesigns. To get started, check out a site like 99Designs, where you can enter design competitions and if you're selected as the winner, you get paid.
Similar to investing, peer-to-peer lending is where you loan money to someone else, and they pay you back with interest. The great thing about peer-to-peer lending is that you can lend as little as $25, and your loan will get bundled into a bigger loan for the borrower. Each month, they'll pay you back principal and interest. You can snowball this initial investment into many investments because you get your principal back as well each month. Many lenders earn over 5%-7% on their investments. Check out Lending Club to get started.

Did you know that those people asking for your signature outside the grocery store are typically paid to get you to sign up? Contrary to popular belief, they aren't pushing politics because they care. They are pushing for your signature because they typically get $1-$2 per signature. If you could get 30 people to sign up per hour, you're making $30-$60 per hour. Not bad.
Maybe you prefer to take pictures versus creating a painting? That's fine, and there are ways to sell your stock photos as well. The Penny Hoarder has a great guide to selling stock photography, and it breaks down step by step how to sell on iStockPhoto or Shutterstock. When you start out, you will earn roughly 15% of the selling price, but it can go up to 50% over time.
Watch for emails asking for note-takers. Once a fellow students' needs are documented, disability services will contact the professors and ask for volunteers in the class to take notes, and your professor will in turn email the class. You can also upload your notes to a platform like Stuvia, where you can earn money by selling your notes to other classmates.
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